Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BioPsychoSocial Medicine and BioMed Central.

Open Access Research

The relationship between perceived sense of control and visceral adipose tissue - the North Texas Healthy Heart Study

Roberto Cardarelli12*, Sandy-Asari Hogan1, Kimberly G Fulda23 and Joan Carroll4

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Behavioral and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA

2 Primary Care Research Center/Texas Prevention Institute, University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA

3 Department of Family Medicine, Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA

4 Department of Integrative Physiology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA

For all author emails, please log on.

BioPsychoSocial Medicine 2011, 5:12  doi:10.1186/1751-0759-5-12

Published: 13 September 2011

Abstract

Background

The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between one's sense of control and visceral adipose tissue.

Methods

This cross-sectional study recruited 571 subjects (45 years and older) who were asymptomatic of CHD from Fort Worth, Texas from 2006 to 2008. Subjects completed a questionnaire, body measurements, a multi-slice computed tomography scan to assess for visceral adipose tissue (VAT) centered at the L4L5 spinal interspace, and serum chemistries. The natural log of L4L5 VAT (lnVAT) was used in all analyses to achieve normality of the data with final analyses including 506 participants. Linear regression was used to estimate unadjusted and adjusted beta-coefficients and standard errors for the association between sense of control and lnVAT.

Results

A total of 506 participants were used in the data after adjusting for normality of the data. An increase in sense of control was associated with a decrease in lnVAT in the unadjusted (p < 0.001) and adjusted (p = 0.03) models. Other factors significantly associated with lnVAT in the adjusted model include age, BMI, male gender, non-Hispanic African American, and diet.

Conclusions

Sense of control remained as an independent factor associated with visceral adiposity despite adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, including BMI. Future studies should focus on establishing a causal relationship between sense of control and visceral adiposity.

Keywords:
Sense of control; visceral adipose tissue; cardiovascular; psychosocial